Tagged: pop

Last night a DJ ruined my life: a Valentines Day playlist

My resolutely unromantic Valentines Day playlist this year consists of:

Robots in Disguise, ‘Chains’
Einstürzende Neubauten, ‘Jet’M’
The Bush Tetras, ‘Too Many Creeps’
The Slits, ‘I Heard it Through the Grapevine’
Amy Winehouse, ‘Back to Black’
Pulp, ‘Bad Cover Version’
Magazine, ‘Permafrost'(apocalyptic version off one of their Peel sessions)
Super Furry Animals, ‘Juxtapozed With U’

It can be listened to here on 8tracks, if you like.

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Ginger snaps: Nicola Roberts, Cinderella’s Eyes

Written for Wears the Trousers 10.10.11.

With Cheryl Cole having reached the apex of her particular fairytale upon her elevation to international pop princess, spare a thought for her Girls Aloud colleagues still at home raking the embers. While Cinderella’s Eyes is by no means a game-changer in the pop world, it succeeds at least in making a more engaging claim to the pop crown than either Cole or Coyle. After a so-so opening with the admirably obnoxious ‘Beat Of My Drum’ and the disjointed ‘Lucky Day’, Roberts lets the veil fall. Listing a litany of woes – her own insecurities, displacement, resentment at being subject to the whims of others, an endless parade of ‘fakers’, mean girls, industry executives, backstabbing, vaulting ambition, superficiality, disingenuousness and the inability to speak openly and honestly – against a relentless, incongruously chirpy off-kilter electro pulse and drum machine pounding, studded with the odd stab at Feminism 101 (“Makeup is make-believe”), it’s like finding extracts from The Bell Jar slipped inside a copy of Heat. Continue reading

Can Adele and her Marketing Men change the face of Women in Music?

Written for Bad Reputation, 1.6.11
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Poor old millionaire superstar Adele, eh? No sooner has the dust settled on the furore over her objections to being a higher-rate taxpayer, than she gets thrown into the vanguard of another of those putative Real Women in Music revolutions. A mere three years after she started out, and after just seventeen weeks of her second album at Number One, it appears to have suddenly dawned on Richard Russell that Adele exemplifies all that’s healthy and hopeful in the otherwise dire and overheated state of contemporary pop. Continue reading